King City Quilters Display Beautiful Works of Art

Quilters at King City Senior Village whose quilts were on display in the October show include (from left) Sung Lee, Lonna Love, Mary Glassmeyer, Mollie Craig and Pat Isaac. BARBARA SHERMAN/TIGARD LIFE

One of many popular programs at King City Senior Village is the annual Quilt Show, when beautiful and unique quilts made by talented residents are displayed all over the facility.

This year there were 35 entries, and a few of the quilters sat down to talk about their entries and quilting history, which for some has been almost a lifetime.

“I have made so many at different times in my life that I can’t even count them,” Mollie Craig said. “I started quilting as a teen, and don’t make them for a particular reason. I had eight sisters, and I made a lot for them for my family. I say that I made quilts instead of raising babies. I have made dozens.

“I would like to make one more. I think every quilter says that, but there is no way I can get the materials I need to make one.”

Lonna Love learned how to quilts from her mother when she was 11 years old, “and I have kept on doing it most of the time,” she said. “I have made quilts for my two children, 20 grandchildren and one great-grandchild when they got married or for some other occasion. I always had a reason to make one.”

Pat Isaac said she started quilting in 1999 because of her grandmother who took care of her during World War II when her dad was serving in the military and her mom was working. Her first quilt was a wedding-ring pattern that she made while living in the original Sun City in Arizona where she joined a quilting group and took classes.

Pat, who has made a lot of small quilts for wall hangings, said, “Now I have the bow-tie top of a quilt done, but it needs to be quilted.”

Sung Lee joined a Tualatin Senior Center quilt group in 2005 and enjoyed making small baby quilts. “It was fun, but it’s hard on the hands,” she said.

Mary Glassmeyer said her mom was a quilter who made quilts that were not for decoration but actually used by the family. “I wanted to paint and decided to paint with fabric,” she said. “In 1994 I saw a cathedral window that was not exactly a quilt, and I made three. But I was busy with children and a job until 1996 when my husband made me a quilt frame.

“I have made seven quilts here and have waited for this quilt show since March when I moved here. I only do hand-quilting and applique, but I machine-stitch the top piece. Most went to my kids and four grandsons, and a friend got one.”

Mary’s quilts have been displayed at the Northwest Quilters Association’s Expo, the American Quilters Society International Show and others. “At the Quilt Expo, I took second place and won $75,” she said. “That is the only time I have ever won anything.”