County approves bonding for Terrace Glen affordable housing project

The 144-unit Terrace Glen affordable housing project is scheduled to begin construction this month
The 144-unit Terrace Glen affordable housing project is scheduled to begin construction this month on property on Greenburg Road across from the Washington Square Mall. Courtesy/Washington County

Work on a new, 144-unit affordable housing project began last month in Tigard, as demolition crews began knocking down the Gethsemane Lutheran Church on S.W. Greenburg Road across from the Washington Square Mall. 

The four-story Terrace Glen affordable housing project in Tigard will contain a mixture of one, two, three and even four-bedroom apartments.
The four-story Terrace Glen affordable housing project in Tigard will contain a mixture of one, two, three and even four-bedroom apartments. Courtesy/Washington County

Once workers finish removing the single-story church building, excavation will begin on the 2.88 acre property. The four-story apartment building was designed by C2K Architects and is scheduled for completion in May 2023. The project is being built for the Housing Authority of Washington County and is one of no fewer than 10 separate affordable housing projects currently under development in the county that are at least partially funded by Metro’s 2018 affordable housing bond.

“It is literally across the street from Washington Square Mall on Greenburg Road,” said Shannon Wilson, Housing Development Manager for Washington County. “Terrace Glen is one of the 10 metro bond projects that we currently have in our pipeline. This will be the third one of those to begin construction.” 

The project is public-private partnership between Related NW and the Housing Authority. 

The Housing Authority’s Board of Directors approved the issuing of $29 million worth of private activity bonds at their Nov. 2 meeting. That will ultimately cover a portion of the estimated $53 million project budget, while Metro bond funding will cover another $17 million. 

The location, Wilson added, gives residents the advantage of easy access to shopping as well as transit. 

The building will consist of 29 studios, 41 one-bedrooms, 58 two-bedrooms, 13 three-bedrooms and three four-bedroom units. Forty three apartments will be for households at 30 percent of the average median income (AMI), and 101 units for those at 60 percent AMI. 

“This is the only project in our pipeline that has four bedroom units, so we are excited about that,” Wilson said. 

In addition to the family-sized apartments, three permanent supportive housing units for young adults at risk of homelessness will be included and serviced by a trio of non-profit partners that include the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization, EngAGE Northwest and HomePlate Youth Services. 

The project also benefited from a robust public engagement process, which shaped what types of units, as well as amenities, would be included. That process focused on engaging with local communities of concern and historically marginalized groups. 

“I’m really excited to see you all doing that and engaging the community in that way,” board member Mike Savara said.

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Josh Kulla is a writer and photographer with experience reporting on city, county and state government, as well as photographing news, sports and events, across the Portland metropolitan area. In his spare time, he can be found photographing Northwest landscapes. He can be reached at josh@tigardlife.com.